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Recent Examples of Personal Injury Settlement Amounts & What You Should Expect

Recent Examples of Personal Injury Settlement Amounts & What You Should Expect

We’re sorry to hear about your accident. No amount of money can repair the damages you’ve suffered to your health, but it doesn’t hurt to be compensated for someone else’s mistake. If you feel flustered after your accident, you’re not alone. Many people aren’t sure what they should get from such traumatic experiences. Let’s look at a few recent examples of personal injury settlement amounts for you and your lawyer to glean information from. Examples of Personal Injury Settlement Amounts Personal injury settlement amounts vary wildly based on what happened, the extent of the injuries incurred, who’s at fault, and your representation. Here, we’ll show you some recent court settlement amounts to give you an idea of what you’re getting involved with. The Cyclist and the Low Hanging Branch Be careful on your bicycle. In this case, a young man was cycling and collided with a low-hanging tree branch that he didn’t see. The insurance companies contended that the accident was the fault of the man and that the tree branches were visible enough to avoid. Reconstruction and tree experts were brought in to prove that the low-hanging branch was an “accident waiting to happen.” The man settled for $110,000 from the insurance companies. Maryland Route 97 Car Accident In 2016, a woman was traveling on Route 97 in Anne Arundel County. She was stopped in traffic and was subsequently rear-ended. Since she didn’t immediately believe herself to be injured, police weren’t called. The $5,300 of damage to her vehicle was reported, but she later had experienced degeneration in her spinal discs from a prior accident. She thus received neck block injections and...
Tips for Maximizing Your Personal Injury Accident Settlement

Tips for Maximizing Your Personal Injury Accident Settlement

Over 8 million people are hospitalized as a result of slips and falls each year. Add to that the number of people injured via car accidents and other events, and you have a lot of Americans needing to ask themselves some very serious questions. How will I pay for my medical bills? What will I do if I can’t work? Why did this happen to me? If you’re like millions of people struggling from the effects of a personal injury that occurred through no fault of your own, you may be considering filing a lawsuit against the responsible party and getting a fair accident settlement. To make sure that you get the compensation you deserve, our team has put together this list of quick tips to maximize your settlement amount. 1. Investigate Thoroughly When it comes to accident cases, there is going to be a lot of “he said/she said.” To get past exposition and expose the facts, you or preferably your accident attorney will need to do some serious digging. Be sure that witness statements get collected, police reports are obtained, and you get your medical records. Furthermore, consider working with private investigators to see what other kind of critical evidence can be dug up. 2. Never Release Your Records to The Opposite Party’s Insurance Company After an accident, a 3rd party insurance company may request access to your medical records. Never sign them over. While your insurance company may be allowed access to your records, 3rd parties are not entitled to that information. If they get granted access, they may use the information against you. 3. Don’t Jump at the First Offer Insurance...
4 Most Famous Personal Injury Cases

4 Most Famous Personal Injury Cases

While most personal injury cases deal with typical slip and falls, car accidents, or defective devices, there are also some cases that are so unusual they’ve become famous. These are a few of the most legendary personal injury cases to make their way through the court system. Stella Liebeck Versus McDonald’s Perhaps the most famous personal injury case of all is Liebeck vs. McDonald’s, otherwise known as the hot coffee case. In 1992, Stella Liebeck ordered a cup of coffee from McDonald’s. As the 79-year-old was holding the coffee between her legs in the passenger seat of a parked car, the coffee spilled on her lap and caused third-degree burns. Before Liebeck’s case, McDonald’s had received over 700 reports of injury from its coffee. Liebeck offered to settle for $20,000 to cover lost income and medical expenses, but McDonald’s thought it would win the case and went to trial. However, the jury sided with Liebeck. She and McDonald’s eventually reached a confidential settlement. Bret Michaels Versus CBS In 2009, Bret Michaels, lead singer of the rock band Poison, suffered an injury to his face at the Tony Awards, which was broadcast by CBS. Michaels claimed that a set piece hit him in the face because CBS didn’t tell him how to exit the stage safely. Immediately after the incident, he had X-rays that showed a broken nose. A few months later, he also suffered a brain hemorrhage, which he believes was from the accident. Michaels and CBS eventually settled the lawsuit, and the terms were not made public. Cedrick Makara Versus Newmark Realty and 40 Worth Associates A jury awarded Cedrick...
$227 Million Settlement Reached in 2013 Building Collapse Case

$227 Million Settlement Reached in 2013 Building Collapse Case

The longest civil trial in the history of the city of Philadelphia wrapped up on February 8, 2017, with a settlement for the plaintiffs: twelve people who were injured and the families of the seven people who perished in a building collapse in June 2013. The collapse occurred when the demolition of a Center City building owned by New York real estate/adult entertainment magnate Richard Basciano caused an adjacent building housing a Salvation Army consignment store to collapse under four stories of brick. The Philadelphia Daily News reported on court documents that stated Basciano was at the scene of the demolition in a conference with the contractor, Griffin Campbell, as the building began to collapse. In a related criminal case, convictions were handed to Campbell, and the excavator operator, Sean Benschop, who were sent to prison for 15 to 30 years and 7 ½ to 15 years, respectively, for their roles in the collapse. The publicized seventeen-week civil trial ended with a settlement of $227 million, to be paid by Basciano and the Salvation Army to the plaintiffs. According to an anonymous source reported in the Philadelphia Daily News, $200 million is to be paid by the Salvation Army, and $27 million by Basciano.The settlement money is to be divided via an arbitrator among the victims of the collapse and their families. Victims sustained serious injuries in the collapse. One woman suffered such extensive injuries under the prolonged weight of the rubble, that she underwent 30 surgeries including amputation of her lower body at the hips.Part of the settlement will help to pay for the woman’s medical care, which is expected...

Liability Waiver Saves LA Fitness from Personal Injury Lawsuit

Going to the gym is nothing new, but being active has been a trend for a few years now. Some will jog or use their own treadmill to stay active, but most will frequent gyms like LA Fitness. The great thing about gyms like these is the option to work out with a personal trainer. However, for every membership, there are pages of legal paperwork that you have to sign. Usually, we think just to skip over this and sign away, but this is exactly what caused Patricia Evans to lose her personal injury case against LA Fitness. When signing up for a membership, the legal work normally includes documents like membership agreement, personal training agreement, and a release of liability. The release of liability page states something along the lines of acknowledging that you read the terms and assumption of risk. No business ever wants someone to get hurt on their premises, but they still need to have an action plan in case something does happen and in this case, it was their release of liability. While working out with her personal trainer, Evans fell while she was sprinting and performing “suicide runs.” Evans fractured both of her wrists after trying to catch herself from her fall, which also resulted in nerve damage after the healing. Evans claims that she fell after her trainer continued to tell her to go faster. However, one of the biggest holes in her case was that she was not forced to exercise and when exercising it is at her own risk. In this case, the wording would have also been crucial to her...

Wording is Everything in this Personal Injury Case

Every personal injury case is unique and the latest one from Massachusetts is no different. Gun ownership can be a tricky case because there are always two sides to a story. In a Smith & Wesson case, a couple was trying to sue because of a possible defect with their product. While visiting a gun store in Murfreesboro, TN, Randy and Vicki McNeal were attempting to put their gun in its safety lock when it dropped and discharged during the fall. Mr. McNeal claims that he was having trouble locking the gun because a loose screw from the sight was in the way, causing him to drop the gun accidentally. After attempting to catch the gun, it fired and shot Mr. McNeal’s pinky finger. After the accident, Mr. McNeal needed to have his pinky finger amputated because there was no way to save it, resulting in costly medical bills. Randy and Vicki decided to sue the gun maker Smith & Wesson for $75,000 for personal injury and for their faulty product. What made this a difficult case was the wording in the couple’s claim. Simply put, an injury does not prove that a product is faulty. In addition, if a product has a defect, a company is not necessarily liable because companies do not have to make “accident proof” products. This is why many companies place multiple warning labels or booklets within the product packaging, even if the warning seems silly, it can save the company from cases like this. U.S. Judge Todd Campbell dismissed this case within federal court because the screw is not what caused Mr. McNeal...