Free Consultation 1.800.ASK.FREE (275.3733)
Free Consultation 1.800.ASK.FREE (275.3733)
Slip and Fall Accidents

Slip and Fall Accidents

Slip and fall accidents are more common than you might think, with nearly one million occurring annually. While some result in minor injuries, others are considerably worse, resulting in broken bones and even death. Though they can happen anywhere from a simple trip to the grocery store to an extravagant cruise ship vacation, the sad fact is many slip and fall accidents are preventable. Let’s learn about the most common incidents and how you can avoid them. Common Slip and Fall Accidents Weather as the Culprit Slip and fall accidents that occur as a result of weather are common. The truth is you can’t control the weather. Thunderstorms, tornadoes, and even hurricanes can wreak havoc in and around property often resulting in hazards that turn in to accident sites. Businesses, including restaurants, shops, hotels, and more are responsible for sidewalks, parking areas, entryways, and interiors free of debris and water which can create slip and fall hazards. If you find yourself out and about before, during, or after a storm, be cautious as you go from place to place and avoid areas that might cause issues. Of course, you can’t always see slippery spots and falls with injuries do occur. Should you sustain an injury as a result of a weather-related slip and fall as a result of negligence on the part of a business, help is available for you. Wet, Uneven Surfaces – With or Without Weather Issues More than 50 percent of all slip and fall accidents are caused by wet or uneven surfaces. While some of these are the result of weather conditions, others are not....

Most Dangerous Holidays to be on The Road

As the children head back to school, adults realize the holiday season is approaching. With the advent of the holiday season, comes a rise in traffic and accidents on the road. Recent studies confirm what travelers have always known – holidays are among the most dangerous times to be on the road. During the holidays, increased traffic, along with travelers driving in unfamiliar areas, and driving while tired or under the influence, means higher accident and fatality rates around holidays. Let’s explore the most dangerous holidays to be on the road, as well as ways to drive safer and smarter should you find yourself traveling during the upcoming holiday seasons. The Most Dangerous Holidays to Drive Studies show that holidays, in general, denote a nearly 35 percent increase in car accidents, with fatalities increased to nearly 40 percent. The two most dangerous travel holidays are Thanksgiving (100 percent increase in accidents) and New Year’s Day (95 percent increase in accidents). On Thanksgiving, most families travel the day before after work. They are typically tired and rushing after work, or on Thursday when they are rushed, distracted, and stressed trying to arrive at their destination on time. New Year’s Day means New Year’s Eve revelers who have been drinking, eating, and celebrating until early morning are on the road, increasing alcohol-related accidents. Independence Day (aka 4th of July) when drinking, driving, and accidents go hand in hand. Majority of accidents happen on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, particularly when the holiday falls on a weekend. Memorial Day when everyone prepares for the start of summer and the season ahead. Labor...
Traveling with the Kids this Summer? Learn Our Top Road Safety Tips

Traveling with the Kids this Summer? Learn Our Top Road Safety Tips

Summer is here and for many families, it’s time to hit the road! Driving is second nature, but it’s easy to forget how to be safe during a long car ride- especially when you’re travelling with kids. Summer driving leads to more accidents because there are more people on the road. So what are the best ways to stay safe during your drive? Keep the road safety tips listed below in mind, so you get your family through the road trip in one piece. 1. Have Your Vehicle Inspected Your car might work fine on short trips. But when is the last time you tested it’s performance for hours at a time? If there is an issue with your car, extended use could cause that issue to present itself and create a dangerous situation on the road.  Some of the most important components to check before embarking on your vacation are your tires, brakes, and all engine fluids. The summer heat adds more stress to your engine making it work harder to run. A quick trip to the mechanic could decrease the chance of any of these problems happening and an accident occurring. 2. Limit Distractions When you’re traveling for summer activities, getting your whole family together in one vehicle can mean added noise, movement, and distractions you may not be used to dealing with on your daily commute. Remember to bring vehicle-appropriate activities, snacks, and beverages with you to keep kids occupied. If your children will have access to tablets, mobile phones, or any other kind of electronic devices, make sure they also have headphones to reduce noise.  3. Remember to Schedule Breaks...

Lesser Known Florida Driving Laws

For some of us, studying for our license was a months-long process with flash cards, color-coded highlighting, pop quizzes, and group study sessions. For the rest of us, it was more like a mad dash to the finish line after days of cramming. We’ve put together some of the lesser known Florida traffic laws that may surprise you.   You must move over for tow trucks We’ve all seen the signs on the highway urging us to move over for emergency vehicles. But did you know this law also extends to tow trucks that are responding to an accident or disabled car? Moving over a lane helps to ensure the safety of all people present at, or responding to, an emergency scene.   Minimum speed limits are a real thing You may think you are being extra safe by driving slowly on the highway, but minimum speed limits (just like maximums) are in place for the safety of all drivers. As a general rule, the minimum speed limit on most highways is 40 miles per hour. If the maximum speed is 70 miles per hour, the minimum increases to 50 miles per hour.     You can’t drive with your hazard lights on Contrary to popular belief, hazard lights are only to be used when your car is stopped. The intended purpose of these blinking lights is to help identify immobilized vehicles that may be obstructing traffic flow to approaching vehicles. Hazard lights are not to be used while your vehicle is moving for any reason- including heavy rain. If weather conditions become too intense or obstructive for your personal...

Construction Workplace Safety Tips

According to OSHA, nearly 6.5 million people work at approximately 252,000 construction sites across the nation on any given day. The fatal injury rate for the construction industry is higher than the national average in this category for any other industry. It is important to be practical, ergonomic, and safe when working in any construction area. Follow some of the tips below to ensure complete safety when working in a construction area: Common Safety Tips to Follow: Keep eyes and ears protected at all times – this is important as these are often times intense noises and vibrations occurring on construction sites which can cause serious injuries Always be aware of your surroundings Know, understand, and follow the workplace’s comprehensive safety program Don’t use damaged tools Do not carry or pull a tool by is cord or hose Double check work areas Scaffolding Safety Tips to Follow: Nearly 2.3 million construction workers work on scaffolds each year.  Unfortunately, fall hazards are likely to occur when scaffolds are misused or erected improperly; an estimated 4,500 injuries and 50 fatalities occur each year as a result of scaffolding. Below are important safety tips to follow when scaffolding: Do not support scaffolds or any other uneven surface with unsteady or portable objects Stay at least 10 feet from power lines when working on a scaffold Never overload a scaffold Do not use a damaged or weakened scaffold Never use a scaffold in bad weather Always keep an eye out for yourself and others on the scaffold or below the scaffold – everyone in the vicinity of a scaffold may be in danger...