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Cruise Disasters: How Common Are Accidents, Injuries, and Other Mishaps?

Cruise Disasters: How Common Are Accidents, Injuries, and Other Mishaps?

Accidents can happen anywhere, but if you’re ready to board a cruise ship for your next vacation you need to be cautious. Cruise disasters may not happen all too often as car accidents or plane crashes, but they do happen. From storms to explosions, the number of things that can go wrong when out to sea are numerous. Here’s everything you need to know about what can go wrong and what you can do if such things arise. One Of The Safest Ways To Travel “Airplanes are the safest way to travel.” You’ve heard this at least once in your life. Without a doubt, this phrase is partially true. According to the BBC, while the likelihood of injury or death during a flight is low, cruise ships have – on average – a lower death rate. The number of people who died during commercial flights peaked at 373 in 2011. Car accidents faired worse with the World Health Organization estimating over a million deaths each year. If you’re ever in a car accident, here’s a brief guide on what you should do. As for cruise ships, between 2005 and 2011, the death toll peaked out at 16 people out of 100 million passengers. Types of Cruise Disasters With casinos and buffets, cruises have plenty of things to distract you from the laborious duties that get the ship to move. There’s plenty that can go awry from technical mishaps and people falling overboard to gastrointestinal outbreaks. From 2009 to 2013, cruise ship incidents rose. From technical failures, fires, and collisions, the death toll reached 50 with over 300 injuries. Gastrointestinal...

Construction Workplace Safety Tips

According to OSHA, nearly 6.5 million people work at approximately 252,000 construction sites across the nation on any given day. The fatal injury rate for the construction industry is higher than the national average in this category for any other industry. It is important to be practical, ergonomic, and safe when working in any construction area. Follow some of the tips below to ensure complete safety when working in a construction area: Common Safety Tips to Follow: Keep eyes and ears protected at all times – this is important as these are often times intense noises and vibrations occurring on construction sites which can cause serious injuries Always be aware of your surroundings Know, understand, and follow the workplace’s comprehensive safety program Don’t use damaged tools Do not carry or pull a tool by is cord or hose Double check work areas Scaffolding Safety Tips to Follow: Nearly 2.3 million construction workers work on scaffolds each year.  Unfortunately, fall hazards are likely to occur when scaffolds are misused or erected improperly; an estimated 4,500 injuries and 50 fatalities occur each year as a result of scaffolding. Below are important safety tips to follow when scaffolding: Do not support scaffolds or any other uneven surface with unsteady or portable objects Stay at least 10 feet from power lines when working on a scaffold Never overload a scaffold Do not use a damaged or weakened scaffold Never use a scaffold in bad weather Always keep an eye out for yourself and others on the scaffold or below the scaffold – everyone in the vicinity of a scaffold may be in danger...

Summer BBQ Safety Tips

Memorial Day is fast approaching, and with it summertime BBQs and outdoor events. While your family is enjoying the summer sun and delicious food, it’s important to make sure that proper food safety guidelines are followed. Here are some tips to help keep your food safe this summer:   Keep foods at their recommended temperature We all know that raw meats like uncooked burgers, steaks, chicken, and fish all need to be kept cold. But, that same rule applies to deli meat, cut up fruit and vegetables, and dairy products like cheese and sour cream. You’ll want to pack at least three coolers with ice to keep raw food separate from everything else. Try to find a shady spot to keep the coolers, and remember to keep the coolers containing food products closed. Beverages should be kept in another cooler as constant opening and closing will result in unstable temperatures and faster ice melt.   Be prepared If you plan on preparing food and cooking outdoors, you’ll want to make sure you bring at least two cutting boards: one for raw foods and one for cooked foods. Extra plates, cooking utensils, and silverware should also be packed for the same reason. Cross-contamination between raw foods and cooked foods can increase the chances of foodborne illness. You’ll also want to bring a food thermometer with you so you know each food item has been cooked to its proper temperature. A jug of water and some antibacterial soap is a great addition if you won’t be near a bathroom to wash your hands.   Know your numbers According to the USDA,...